Connect with us

Alternative Fuels

WasteFuel launches WasteFuel Methanol Module to produce green methanol bunker fuel

WasteFuel Methanol Module can produce up to 100 mt per day of fuel grade methanol from waste sources including landfill gas and biogas from anaerobic digestion.

Admin

Published

on

191

Waste-to-fuel developer WasteFuel on Monday (19 September) said it has launched the WasteFuel Methanol Module, a new technology that will significantly accelerate the use of organic waste to produce green methanol bunker fuel. 

The WasteFuel Methanol Module is designed to produce up to 100 metric tonnes (mt) per day of fuel grade methanol from a variety of waste sources including landfill gas and biogas from anaerobic digestion. The process is designed in a modular fashion to improve the overall utilisation of resources and allow for cost-effective, quick scaling.

WasteFuel has filed a provisional patent application directly related to the novel approach and unique configuration. The process is engineered to simultaneously wet and dry reform to convert waste into green methanol. The technology will be available for licensing meaning even greater potential for adoption and decarbonisation.

When utilised at a commercial scale the WasteFuel Methanol Module will produce green methanol fuel that can achieve up to 90% reductions in CO2 and other greenhouse gases and pollutants compared to conventional fuels.

"Green methanol is critically important in decarbonising global shipping and the supply chains of companies who depend on it. There is also a vast market for green methanol in the petrochemicals space. The WasteFuel Methanol Module will allow WasteFuel and companies who licence the technology to convert municipal waste more efficiently into green methanol around the world,” said Trevor Neilson, Co-founder, Chairman and CEO of WasteFuel. 

“Consumer product companies who have made net zero commitments will not be able to meet them without a dramatic expansion of green methanol supply," Neilson added.

WasteFuel aims to produce green methanol that can be used in a variety of markets including shipping, marine transport, and petrochemicals, as well as to license its proprietary process to customers across markets, such as waste owners, biorefinery developers, and petrochemical companies.

Existing WasteFuel Methanol efforts include a commercial-scale partnership with Maersk, who has announced their intent to purchase 30,000 mt per year of WasteFuel’s bio-methanol bunkers.

Related: Maersk secures methanol bunker fuel supply for newbuilds with strategic partnerships

 

Photo credit: WasteFuel
Published: 20 September, 2022

Continue Reading

Bunker Fuel

LR report highlights potential of LPG as bunker fuel in delivering emission reduction

Study, however, outlines that technology readiness will need to improve for LPG to become a viable choice for shipowners and operators looking to transition their fleet to low and zero-carbon vessels.

Admin

Published

on

By

LR report highlights potential of LPG as bunker fuel in delivering emission reduction

Using liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as a marine fuel could deliver a significant carbon reduction, particularly alongside other emissions reduction and energy saving technologies, helping shipowners comply with more stringent regulations into the next decade, according to Lloyd’s Register recently.

The Fuel for Thought: LPG, a joint report from Lloyd’s Register (LR) and the World Liquid Gas Association (WLGA) has found that the market for dual-fuel LPG engines will continue to grow based on a healthy orderbook, with LPG offering a cleaner, lower carbon emission marine energy source than many alternatives currently available.

According to the report, the use of LPG as a marine fuel combined with technology such as Onboard Carbon Capture and Storage (OCCS) can reduce a vessel’s emissions profile, with the added benefit of reducing the required CO2 storage capacity, due to the lower CO2 emissions from LPG combustion. This allows the technology to work more effectively and offers shipowners a pathway towards future regulatory compliance.  

The report, however, outlines that technology readiness will need to improve for LPG to become a viable choice for shipowners and operators looking to transition their fleet to low and zero-carbon vessels.  

Although well established, the range of available engine technologies will need to be expanded to enable widespread adoption of LPG on multiple vessel types. 

Currently there is no four-stroke marine engine capable of using LPG, meaning auxiliary engines on vessels would need to be decarbonised through an additional fuel.

A safe bunkering framework must be also developed to encourage uptake of LPG. Regulations remain in their early stages, with interim guidelines recently published by IMO.

Panos Mitrou, Global Gas Segment Director, Lloyd’s Register, said: “The pace and scale of renewable production for LPG remains a critical factor in initiating the wider adoption of LPG as a marine fuel.”

“Supportive energy-saving technologies, as along with potentially maturing onboard carbon capture and storage, will further assist in making LPG a viable low-zero carbon fuel.”

“By ensuring this, LPG could offer attractive operating and capital costs compared to other alternative fuels as shipowners look to decarbonise their fleets in line with more stringent regulations."

Nikos Xydas, World Liquid Gas Association Technical Director, said: “LPG stands as a unique and exceptional energy source, pivotal for decarbonising the shipping sector.”

“Stored and transported as a liquid and consumed as a gas, it is well recognised for its lower emission benefits as a marine fuel. With a surge in orders for LPG-fuelled ships, it's clear that LPG's role in the shipping industry is expanding.”

“As the world moves towards deep decarbonisation targets, LPG emerges as an ideal fuel for all vessel types, offering a cleaner alternative fuel today and a pathway for an even cleaner future tomorrow.”

“Its flexibility, low emissions, and cost-effectiveness position LPG as the potential fuel of choice in the shipping sector, paving also the way for low-cost deep-sea decarbonisation with the advent of bio/renewable LPG.”

Note: The ‘Fuel for Thought: LPG’ report can be found here.

 

Photo credit: Lloyd’s Register
Published: 21 June, 2024

Continue Reading

LNG Bunkering

CMA CGM takes delivery of fourth LNG-fuelled containership

Naming ceremony and delivery of vessel, organised at HD Hyundai Mipo in Ulsan, South Korea, marked entry of the fourth vessel in a series of ten specially designed for Northern Europe feeder services.

Admin

Published

on

By

CMA CGM takes delivery of fourth LNG-fuelled containership

French shipping giant on Wednesday (19 June) said it celebrated the naming ceremony and delivery of its fourth LNG-fuelled container ship, CMA CGM Tivoli.

Organised at HD Hyundai Mipo in Ulsan, South Korea, on 16 June, the event marked the official entry of the fourth vessel in a series of ten specially designed for Northern Europe feeder services.

“Featuring optimised features for 45-foot containers, increased capacity for refrigerated containers, and innovative forward accommodation to enhance cargo loading and aerodynamics, CMA CGM Tivoli distinguishes itself with a high ‘length to beam" ratio to maximise hydrodynamic efficiency,” the firm said in a social media post. 

“She departed the shipyard on June 15th, 2024, bound for Busan. We wish fair winds and smooth seas to Captain Artur Dumbrov and his crew.” 

 

Photo credit: CMA CGM
Published: 21 June, 2024

Continue Reading

Methanol

Mitsubishi Shipbuilding receives orders for Japan’s first methanol-fuelled RoRo cargo ship duo

Two ships will be built at the Enoura Plant of MHI’s Shimonoseki Shipyard & Machinery Works in Yamaguchi Prefecture, with scheduled completion and delivery by the end of fiscal 2027.

Admin

Published

on

By

Mitsubishi Shipbuilding receives orders for Japan's first methanol-fuelled RoRo cargo ship duo

Mitsubishi Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., a part of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) Group, on Wednesday (19 June) said it has received orders from Toyofuji Shipping and Fukuju Shipping for Japan's first methanol-fueled roll-on/roll-off (RORO) cargo ships. 

The two ships will be built at the Enoura Plant of MHI's Shimonoseki Shipyard & Machinery Works in Yamaguchi Prefecture, with scheduled completion and delivery by the end of fiscal 2027.

The ships will be approximately 169.9 meters in overall length and 30.2 meters in breadth, with 15,750 gross tonnage, and loading capacity for around 2,300 passenger vehicles.

A windscreen at the bow and a vertical stem are used to reduce propulsion resistance, while fuel efficiency is improved by employing MHI's proprietary energy-saving system technology combing high-efficiency propellers and high-performance rudders with reduced resistance. 

The main engine is a high-performance dual-fuel engine that can use both methanol and A heavy fuel oil, reducing CO2 emissions by more than 10% compared to ships with the same hull and powered by fuel oil, contributing to a reduced environmental impact. 

In the future, the use of green methanol(2) may lead to further reduction in CO2 emissions, including throughout the lifecycle of the fuel. Methanol-fueled RORO ships have already entered into service as ocean-going vessels around the world, but this is the first construction of coastal vessels for service in Japan.

In addition, the significant increase in vehicle loading capacity and transport capacity per voyage compared to conventional vessels will provide greater leeway in the ship allocation schedule, securing more holiday and rest time for the crew, thereby contributing to working style reforms.

Mitsubishi Shipbuilding, to address the growing needs from the modal shift in marine transport against the backdrop of CO2 reductions in land transportation, labor shortages, and working style reforms, will continue to work with its business partners to provide solutions for a range of societal issues by building ferries and RORO vessels with excellent fuel efficiency and environmental performance that contribute to stable navigation for customers.

 

Photo credit: Mitsubishi Shipbuilding
Published: 20 June, 2024

Continue Reading
Advertisement
  • v4Helmsman Gif Banner 01
  • Aderco advert 400x330 1
  • RE 05 Lighthouse GIF
  • Consort advertisement v2
  • EMF banner 400x330 slogan
  • SBF2

OUR INDUSTRY PARTNERS

  • Triton Bunkering advertisement v2
  • 102Meth Logo GIF copy
  • SEAOIL 3+5 GIF
  • Singfar advertisement final
  • HL 2022 adv v1


  • intrasea
  • E Marine logo
  • PSP Marine logo
  • Synergy Asia Bunkering logo MT
  • Uni Fuels logo advertisement white background
  • MFA logo v2
  • Auramarine 01
  • metcore
  • CNC Logo Rev Manifold Times
  • Golden Island logo square
  • Advert Shipping Manifold resized1
  • Headway Manifold
  • 400x330 v2 copy
  • VPS 2021 advertisement

Trending