Connect with us

LNG Bunkering

Seatrium delivers Singapore’s first membrane LNG bunker vessel “Brassavola”

Firm has delivered the vessel to owner Indah Singa Maritime and will be chartered by Pavilion Energy to supply LNG bunker fuel in the Port of Singapore, starting in February.

Admin

Published

on

Navig8 takes delivery of first of six eco-friendly newbuild MR IMO 2 tankers

Singapore-headquartered marine engineering firm Seatrium, formed by the merger of Sembcorp Marine and Keppel Offshore and Marine (KOM), on Monday (29 January) announced the successful delivery of Brassavola, Singapore’s first membrane LNG bunker vessel built locally by the Group, to owner Indah Singa Maritime Pte. Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Mitsui O.S.K Lines (MOL).

Following delivery, Brassavola will be chartered by Pavilion Energy to supply LNG bunker in the Port of Singapore. The vessel, which is expected to commence operations in February 2024, will also be deployed by TotalEnergies Marine Fuels to serve its customers under a long-term agreement with Pavilion Energy.

Brassavola, constructed based on a proprietary design by LMG Marin, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Seatrium, adds to the Group’s portfolio of proven LNG bunker vessel designs of various capacities. Measuring 116.5 metres in length and 22.0 metres in width, the vessel incorporates state-of-the-art technology, including superior loading and faster bunkering rate of up to 2,000m3 per hour, mass flow metering and online gas chromatograph systems, for improved bunkering turnover and enhanced operational efficiency.

Brassavola utilises dual-fuel engines, allowing the vessel to run on marine LNG for cleaner and lower-carbon operation. The vessel’s advanced reliquefaction technology also enables more efficient boil-off gas management, which reduces carbon emissions.

The LNG bunker vessel also features two GTT Mark III Flex membrane tanks with superior characteristics which include lower internal pressure, temperature and boil-off rate, enabling greater tank durability, safer fuel transfer operations and reduced cargo loss through evaporation. The twin membrane tanks are optimised to be lighter and space-saving to allow for a larger cargo carrying capacity and greater fuel efficiency during transportation.

Mr Kazuya Hamazaki, Managing Executive Officer of MOL, said, “We are delighted to achieve the successful delivery of Brassavola with our strategic partners at Pavilion Energy and Seatrium. This achievement would not have been possible without the unwavering dedication and collaboration of our partners. The completion of the Brassavola is a significant step forward in transitioning towards the use of cleaner and decarbonised fuels like LNG in Singapore. We look forward to seeing Brassavola in operations very soon, setting new standards in LNG bunkering and further strengthening Singapore's position as a global LNG bunkering hub.”

Mr Malcolm Lim, Division Head of Singapore Hub at Pavilion Energy, said: “The delivery of Singapore’s first membrane LNG Bunker Vessel, Brassavola, represents a transformative step for Pavilion Energy’s decarbonisation journey, and paves the way for a more sustainable maritime industry. We are pleased to be working with our strategic partners to reach this milestone and look forward to commencing the vessel’s operations.”

Brassavola complements our global LNG bunker supply network and reinforces our commitment to provide customers with cleaner marine bunkering solutions.”

Ms Louise Tricoire, Vice President of TotalEnergies Marine Fuels, said, “We are thrilled to receive the Brassavola, which will enable us to commence the supply of marine LNG to our customers in Singapore. The Brassavola plays an important part in our global LNG bunker strategy and in our ambition to help the shipping industry decarbonise using a range of low carbon fuels. Her arrival will complement our current LNG bunker services in the European hubs of Rotterdam and Marseille, as we take our LNG bunker expertise into new markets.”

Mr William Gu, Executive Vice President of Seatrium Oil & Gas (International), said: “We are pleased to mark the delivery of Brassavola, the first membrane LNG bunker vessel that is designed and built in Singapore by Seatrium, embodying our core values of innovation, safety and environmental sustainability. The completion of this LNG bunker vessel with zero loss time incident reinforces our track record in cleaner energy solutions that support the global energy transition. We are proud to play a significant role in advancing Singapore’s maritime decarbonisation ambitions and look forward to the Brassavola contributing to this cause.”

 

Photo credit: Seatrium
Published: 30 January, 2024

Continue Reading

LNG Bunkering

Erik Thun takes delivery of LNG dual-fuel tanker “Thun Vettern”

Vessel, which is the latest contribution to the Vinga-series, has dual-fuel capability, runs on LNG/LBG or gasoil and is fully equipped for shore power connection when available in ports.

Admin

Published

on

By

Erik Thun takes delivery of LNG dual-fuel tanker “Thun Vettern”

Shipping firm Erik Thun on Monday (24 June) said it has taken delivery of Thun Vettern, a 17,999-dwt vessel, which was built by China Merchants Jinling Shipyard in Yangzhou.

The vessel is an upgraded version of the sister Thun Venern. Thun Vettern is the latest contribution to the “Vinga-series”, all trading within the Gothia Tanker Alliance. The Thun Vettern is the newest and latest edition to the Vinga-series and she has ice class 1A. 

The vessels in the Vinga-series all have dual-fuel capability, run on LNG/LBG or gasoil and are fully equipped for shore power connection when available in ports.

They are designed with a battery hybrid solution and several innovative features that reduce fuel and energy consumption, resulting in extensively lowered emissions of CO2, sulphur oxide, nitrogen oxide and hazardous particles. 

The firm said the ships have scored the best Energy Efficiency Design Index or EEDI value in their segment globally, meaning that they are the most energy efficient vessels according to the International Maritime Organization (IMO). 

The Vinga-series is designed for the intense and demanding trade in the North Sea and Scandinavia, well suited to meet the growing European demand for biofuels and renewable feedstocks.

Erik Thun´s close partner Furetank will technically and commercially manage the new vessel which upon delivery will enter into the Gothia Tanker Alliance network.

“Sustainability work has always been and will be a focus ahead for Erik Thun. To take delivery of a resource efficient, top performing product tanker like Thun Vettern, and further deepen our good and long-term co-operation with Furetank is a great example of our vision to be a sustainable Swedish partner over generations,” said Johan Källsson, Managing Director at Erik Thun AB.

 

Photo credit: Erik Thun
Published: 25 June, 2024

Continue Reading

LNG Bunkering

Wärtsilä on LNG bunker fuel: Expert answers to 17 important questions

Firm gives an expert overview on top questions on LNG bunker fuel including if LNG is a future fuel and what does LNG being a transition fuel means.

Admin

Published

on

By

RESIZED Chris Pagan

Technology group Wärtsilä on Wednesday (19 June) gave an expert overview on top 17 questions related to LNG bunker fuel in this insight article including if LNG is a future fuel: 

Your choice of fuel affects both your profitability and your vessel’s environmental compliance. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is a safe and cost-effective fuel that reduces greenhouse gas emissions and other harmful pollutants. LNG is playing a key role as a transition fuel and is widely seen as the first step towards decarbonising the maritime industry.

Switching to LNG as fuel for ship propulsion requires investment but can save you fuel costs, increase your profitability and reduce compliance risks. The expert answers to these 17 questions will tell you what you need to know about LNG as an alternative fuel for shipping.

What is LNG?

LNG is natural gas that has been cooled to -162°C (-260°F), turning it into a clear, odourless liquid that is easy to ship and store. LNG is typically 85–95% methane, which contains less carbon than other forms of fossil fuels. It is a compact, efficient form of energy that is ideal for ship propulsion.

What is LNG used for?

LNG is primarily used as a clean-burning energy source. It is used for electricity generation, heating, cooking, and as a transportation fuel. LNG is also used as a raw material for products like fertilisers and plastics.

In the shipping industry, LNG as fuel is used for ship propulsion, auxiliary power generation and other onboard energy needs. LNG as an alternative fuel for shipping has gained wide popularity due to its clean-burning properties and potential to help meet stricter emissions regulations.

What are the sources of LNG as fuel for ships? What is bioLNG?

LNG as fuel for ships is produced from natural gas extracted from underground reserves, including both onshore and offshore gas fields.

BioLNG is LNG produced from biogas, which is generated from organic waste like food scraps, agricultural waste, manure and sewage sludge. BioLNG is considered a renewable fuel and can further reduce the carbon footprint of ships using LNG fuel systems.

 Is LNG just methane?

LNG is primarily methane (typically 85–95%), but it also contains small amounts of ethane, propane and other hydrocarbons. LNG can also contain trace amounts of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The exact composition of LNG may vary depending on the source of the natural gas and the liquefaction process used.

 LNG fuel vs. fuel oil: is LNG better than diesel?

Compared to diesel fuel oil, LNG offers several advantages. LNG produces significantly lower emissions when burned, including:

  • 20–30% less CO2 
  • 15-25% less total GHG
  • 90% less NOx 
  • 99% less SOx 
  • Almost no particulate matter (PM) 

LNG engines are also quieter. 

However, LNG has a lower energy density than diesel, so using LNG as an alternative fuel for shipping will require more fuel and therefore larger fuel tanks to achieve the same range.

 What are the advantages and disadvantages of LNG fuel?

The key advantages of LNG as fuel include reduced emissions and cost competitiveness. There is also an established and continuously growing global network of LNG bunkering facilities.

The disadvantages of using LNG as fuel for ships include the need for specialised equipment and training and the potential for methane slip.

Methane slip is when unburned methane, a potent greenhouse gas, escapes into the atmosphere. Modern dual-fuel engines will minimise this issue. Depending on engine type and load, you can reduce methane slip by up to 65% by upgrading your ship’s existing engines. Over the last 30 years, Wärtsilä has reduced the methane slip from its engines by around 90%.

 Is LNG environmentally friendly?

LNG is cleaner burning than traditional marine fuels, but it is still a fossil fuel. BioLNG, which is LNG produced from organic waste or biomass, can be considered a more sustainable alternative to fossil-based LNG as it has a lower carbon footprint. However, the production and combustion of bioLNG still emit some greenhouse gases. LNG can be seen as a bridging fuel in the transition to alternative fuels like methanol and ammonia, which aren’t yet widely available at scale.

 Is LNG a future fuel?

LNG both is and isn’t a future fuel. It enables lower greenhouse gas emissions and reduces other harmful air pollutants compared to fuel oil, but it is still a fossil fuel. Sustainable future fuels are crucial for maritime decarbonisation, but the current cost, limited availability and insufficient infrastructure are challenging for operators. This gives LNG an important role to play in the shipping industry’s transition to a zero-carbon future.

As more ports develop LNG bunkering infrastructure and more ships are built with LNG fuel systems, the use of LNG as an alternative fuel for shipping is expected to increase. LNG is considered a stepping stone on the path to decarbonisation as the industry moves closer to using true future fuels such as methanol and ammonia.

Note: The full article by Wärtsilä can be found here.

 

Photo credit: Chris Pagan on Unsplash
Published: 24 June, 2024

Continue Reading

Alternative Fuels

ENGINE on Fuel Switch Snapshot: Bunkering gets pricier in Singapore

All prices rise sharply in Singapore; LNG inches closer to VLSFO; Rotterdam’s B24-VLSFO premium over LNG widens.

Admin

Published

on

By

ENGINE on Fuel Switch Snapshot: Bunkering gets pricier in Singapore

Once a week, bunker intelligence platform ENGINE will publish a snapshot of alternative and conventional bunker fuel prices in the world’s two biggest bunkering hubs. The following is the latest snapshot:

24 June 2024

Singapore's bunker fuel prices have increased across the board over the past week. Conventional fuel prices have climbed $17-20/mt higher, while bio-bunker blends have gained slightly less, at $12-17/mt. LNG has increased by $14/mt in the port.

The price gap between Rotterdam's LNG and VLSFO grades has narrowed in the past week. LNG is now only $2/mt cheaper than VLSFO in Rotterdam with estimated EU Allowance (EUA) costs for voyages between two EU ports added, down from $15/mt a week earlier. The price difference is wider without EUAs, at $8/mt, and has come down from $21/mt.

The B24-VLSFO premium over pure VLSFO has moved $2/mt lower in Rotterdam and $8/mt lower in Singapore.

VLSFO

Rotterdam’s VLSFO benchmark has increased by $7/mt in the past week. Steady availability of the grade in Rotterdam and the wider ARA region could explain its gains falling short of a $19/mt ($2.62/bbl) jump in front-month Brent futures.

Singapore's VLSFO benchmark has climbed $20/mt in the past week, mirroring Brent's rise.

A sharp tightening of VLSFO availability in the port has supported price gains. Most suppliers indicate lead times of 7-17 days for the grade, a significant increase from 2-11 days the week prior.

Biofuels

Rotterdam’s B24-VLSFO HBE price has been steadier in the past week, with only a $5/mt gain. Availability of bio-blended bunkers remains good in Rotterdam and the ARA hub, a source says. 

Singapore’s B24-VLSFO price has gained $12/mt in the past week. The bio-bunker price has gone up despite a $5/mt drop in the UCOME FOB China benchmark, according to PRIMA Markets.

“Lower offers last week of $960-980/t were still mostly met by limited demand, with other optimistic sellers still offering above $1,000/t in other areas of the country,” PRIMA said.

LNG

A $7/mt decline in Rotterdam’s LNG bunker price can be attributed to a drop in the front-month NYMEX Dutch TTF Natural Gas benchmark amid the abundant gas storage levels in European countries.

In contrast, Singapore’s LNG bunker price has jumped higher by $14/mt in the past week.

The price rise in Singapore is supported by higher prices in the Asian LNG market and the Japan/Korea Marker (JKM) price, as well as an extended outage at Chevron's Wheatstone LNG facility in Australia.

By Konica Bhatt

 

Photo credit and source: ENGINE
Published: 25 June 2024

Continue Reading
Advertisement
  • Consort advertisement v2
  • EMF banner 400x330 slogan
  • v4Helmsman Gif Banner 01
  • RE 05 Lighthouse GIF
  • Aderco advert 400x330 1
  • SBF2

OUR INDUSTRY PARTNERS

  • 102Meth Logo GIF copy
  • SEAOIL 3+5 GIF
  • HL 2022 adv v1
  • Singfar advertisement final
  • Triton Bunkering advertisement v2


  • intrasea
  • Auramarine 01
  • PSP Marine logo
  • E Marine logo
  • Synergy Asia Bunkering logo MT
  • Uni Fuels logo advertisement white background
  • CNC Logo Rev Manifold Times
  • Golden Island logo square
  • Kenoil
  • endress
  • VPS 2021 advertisement
  • Advert Shipping Manifold resized1
  • Headway Manifold
  • 400x330 v2 copy

Trending